Genealogy double dating

The 'start of year' change and the calendar system change were not always adopted concurrently.Similarly, civil and religious adoption may not have happened at the same time (or even at all).To reduce misunderstandings about the date, it was normal in parish registers to place a new year heading after 24 March (for example "1661") and another heading at the end of the following December, "1661/62", a form of dual dating to indicate that in the following few weeks the year was 1661 Old Style but 1662 New Style.Some more modern sources, often more academic ones, also use the "1661/62" style for the period between 1 January and 25 March for years before the introduction of the Gregorian calendar in England. Great Britain, Ireland and the British Empire (including much of what is now the eastern part of the United States) adopted the Gregorian calendar in 1752, by which time it was necessary to correct by 11 days.This latter battle was commemorated annually throughout the 18th century on 12 July, following the usual historical convention of commemorating events of that period within Great Britain and Ireland by mapping the Julian date directly onto the modern Gregorian calendar date (as happens for example with Guy Fawkes Night on 5 November).

Thus "New Style" can either refer to the start of year adjustment, or to the adoption of the Gregorian calendar.This change was implemented subsequently in Protestant and Orthodox countries, usually at much later dates.In England and Wales, Ireland, and the British colonies, the change to the start of the year and the changeover from the Julian calendar occurred in 1752 under the Calendar (New Style) Act 1750.Events in continental western Europe are usually reported in English language histories using the Gregorian calendar.For example, the Battle of Blenheim is always given as 13 August 1704.

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